Monday, July 27, 2015

Always learning....

Going to the aquarium in Virginia Beach is a very enjoyable experience. As well as the aquariums full of marine life there are other very interesting exhibits, such as this one showing the Silurian age in Virginia.  You can enlarge the following photos for a clearer look.


The Silurian Period was 443.7 to 416.0 million years ago.  Mind boggling!  It was at a time when the Earth underwent considerable changes that had important repercussions for the environment and life within it.  One result of these changes was the melting of large glacial formations.  This contributed to a substantial rise in the levels of the major seas.  The Silurian witnessed a relative stabilization of the Earth's general climate, ending the previous pattern of erratic climate fluctuations.  


(If you have difficulty reading the writing in the photo below it says: Silurian Virginia was a hot, dry desert surrounded by warm, shallow seas.  Earth's first land dwellers appeared during this period, but most plants and animals still lived in the water.  Trilobites, sea scorpions and other arthropods shared the sea floor with brachiopods, clam-like organisms that were the most common shelled animals.  Above the bottom, bony-armored fishes and squid relatives cruised in search of prey.  On land, spiders, centipedes and worms lived among fungi and simple plants.) 


Coral reefs made their first appearance during this time, and the Silurian was also a remarkable time in the evolution of fishes.  Not only does this time period mark the wide and rapid spread of jawless fish, but also the highly significant appearances of both the first known freshwater fish as well as the first fish with jaws.  It is also at this time that our first good evidence of life on land is preserved, such as relatives of spiders and centipedes, and also the earliest fossils of vascular plants.


The Silurian is a time when many biologically significant events occurred.  In the oceans there was a widespread radiation of crinoids, a continued proliferation and expansion of the brachiopods, and the oldest known fossils of coral reefs.  As mentioned earlier this time period also marks the wide and rapid spread of jawless fish, along with the important appearances of both the first known freshwater fish and the jawed fish.  Other marine fossils commonly found throughout the Silurian record include trilobites, graptolites, conodonts, corals, stromatoporoids and mollusks.

I found the above fascinating information and much more at this website.  

23 comments:

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Beautiful pictures! Almost as good as if I were scuba diving (not that I've ever done that, or ever will) but as I imagine it would be.

Sandra said...

awesome photo at the beginning, i like that fish with claws. a wonderful place to visit. i need to get to our Mote Marine

eileeninmd said...

Hello Denise, What an interesting aquarium exhibit. It would be cool to find fossils from this period! Thanks for sharing, have a happy new week ahead!

Elephant's Child said...

Isn't it wonderful that there is ALWAYS something to learn. Lots of somethings...

KaHolly said...

I find it amazing how sea life has changed so little .

Beatrice Euphemie said...

I don't remember studying this era in school...it is very interesting! Learning something new every day! Thank you for sharing!

Möwe von der Insel said...

Love to see the painting of the stuff
I love going hunting for at the beach :))
Now I know how some of them looked :))

Have a beautiful day!
Möwe

William Kendall said...

Some of these shots remind me of the Water and Fossils galleries at our Nature Museum.

Gail Dixon said...

Fascinating indeed! I had no idea about the Silurian period. Our world is so incredible and diverse. Thank you for sharing this!!

Red said...

I can't get my head around the time of several million years from my puny little life span.

Linda said...

Beautiful and fascinating, Denise! I love the ocean and all the things about it and in it. :)

Adam said...

It's not as famous as the Cambrian period, but I do find that era fascinating. I also like learning what animals appeared when. I looked up about arachnids and they did appear during this period, but true spiders didn't appear until the Carboniferous period.

ladyfi said...

Fascinating and fun!

Mike @ A Bit About Britain said...

Fascinating! My spell-check would've been working overtime writing a piece like that...more seriously, it is amazing, this precious planet of ours. And humbling - equivalent to a 24-hour clock, didn't mankind put in an appearance at a few minutes before midnight or something? Hope you do more from your visit.

Margaret Adamson said...

fabulous post

diane b said...

It sure is an interesting world that we live in. Finding these fossils must be so exciting. I have seen some in rocky outcrops in north west Australia. Where the land used to be under the sea.

Stewart M said...

The deep age of the Earth really does take some getting used to. Looks like a great displa.

Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

Valerie said...

Fascinating place and an interesting post. Love the first picture.

gigihawaii said...

Awesome photos! David and I will revisit the Waikiki Aquarium someday when he is feeling better.

Lowcarb team member said...

It is good to visit aquariums and sea life centres.

Great photo's again Denise.

Hope you are having a good week.

All the best Jan

Cloudia said...

before my time, LOL

pattisjarrett said...

We finally visited there with our grandkids last year. So much to see!

Stephanie said...

Beautiful images!