Saturday, April 18, 2015

TODAY'S FLOWERS # 342

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I took these photos from the last couple of walks along Bull Run.  I wish I could do justice to the actual sight of our Virginia Bluebells.  

The Virginia Bluebell (Mertensia virginica) also goes by the names of Virginia cowslip, lungwort, oysterleaf and Roanoke bells.  It is native to the moist woodlands in eastern North America.  


It is a spring ephemeral plant with bell-shaped, sky-blue flowers opening from pink buds.  The leaves are rounded and gray-green, with stems that grow to 24 inches tall ("Ephemeral" means lasting a very short time).


They belong to the family Boraginaceae, which makes them relatives of other familiar species such as the Forget-me-not, Lungwort and Comfrey. 


 They grow in rich, well-drained soil where they can form large colonies over time.  The flowers start off pink and gradually turn to the most beautiful light blue as they mature.  


Bees, especially female Bumblebees that fly in early spring, will often be seen visiting the flowers.  On our walk we spotted several of them.  However, I read that the real champions of bluebell pollination are butterflies and moths.  



The Virginia Bluebells prefer soils typical of a woodland, and a little on the wet side.  It also likes sun or light shade.


"I am going to try to pay attention to the spring.  I am going to look around at all the flowers, and look up at the hectic trees.  I am going to close my eyes and listen."

~Anne Lamott~


"Flowers are happy things."
~P. G. Wodehouse~


"I'm an introvert...I love being by myself, love being outdoors, love taking a long walk with my dogs and looking at the trees, flowers, the sky."
~Audrey Hepburn~


When I was was looking for  information on these extraordinarily beautiful flowers, I came across this song by Miranda Lambert. 

The lyrics you see on my photo are from Miranda's song, and hold good advice to young and old alike.



If you are unable to access the video below, you can see it here.